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Society for Women & Aids in Africa partners with the Global Fund to train health workers on human rights of vulnerable populations



The Society for Women and Aids in Africa Sierra Leone has partnered with the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria to launch a comprehensive one-week training program designed to educate health workers and service providers on human rights for individuals with HIV, tuberculosis, and other vulnerable key populations. The training program, which commenced from January 22nd to 26th, 2024, aims to equip participants with the necessary knowledge and skills to ensure the protection of human rights while delivering vital healthcare services.


In her opening statement on the first day, Madam Marie Benjamin, the executive director of the Society for Women and Aids in Africa, emphasized the significance of the training and stressed that the primary goal is to educate service providers on effectively engaging with individuals living with HIV, tuberculosis, and other vulnerable conditions without infringing upon their fundamental human rights.


The Technical Adviser on Human Rights and Key Populations at the National HIV/AIDS Secretariat, Amara S. Lebbie, added further insights and explained the pivotal role of the Secretariat in ensuring the provision of appropriate treatment and support for individuals affected by HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria. This includes promoting an approach by service providers that upholds the human rights of those receiving care.


Musu Cumba, an executive member of the Society for Women and Aids in Africa, expressed the critical dependency on these trained service providers and emphasized the immense importance of proper care and support for individuals living with HIV/AIDS. She highlighted the significant challenges faced by those affected and urged for encouragement and support for these individuals, emphasizing the invaluable role played by service providers in improving the lives of people with HIV/AIDS.


The project's objective is to work directly with health workers and community members to eliminate stigma and discrimination against individuals with HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, malaria, and other vulnerable populations, thereby striving to create a more supportive, inclusive, and empowering environment for those in need.


This collaborative effort represents a crucial step towards advancing the rights and well-being of individuals living with HIV, tuberculosis, and other vulnerable conditions, underscoring the commitment of the Society for Women and Aids in Africa and its partners to promote equitable access to healthcare and combat discrimination in Sierra Leone.

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